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Social media rants may affect alimony and child support

Social media, Facebook in particular, has become an integrated part of the lives of many Massachusetts residents. Some of us have become so accustomed to sharing our lives online that we update and post almost automatically, with very little thought given to what could happen to that information once it is out of our hands. However, when it comes to issues surrounding one’s divorce, posting is not the best policy, and can actually have serious ramifications for issues such as child support and alimony. Even if you think that your former partner does not or cannot see your Facebook activity, this is not the place to air your grievances about the marriage or divorce. If you make comments online that can be proven false, such as claiming that your ex is not meeting his or her child support obligations, the other party can sue you for libel. Also consider the long-term ramifications; if you post negative things about the other spouse and he or she loses a job because of it, their ability to pay child support or alimony could be severely limited, and they could approach the court to ask for a reduced amount. Another thing to remember is that Facebook is forever. What you write, can almost always be recovered and brought to the attention of a court, even if you have erased it from your news feed. That heightens the risk that a child may one day read the negative things you said about the other parent.

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Warning: Facebook rants may affect alimony and child support

Social media, Facebook in particular, has become an integrated part of the lives of many Massachusetts residents. Some of us have become so accustomed to sharing our lives online that we update and post almost automatically, with very little thought given to what could happen to that information once it is out of our hands. However, when it comes to issues surrounding one’s divorce, posting is not the best policy, and can actually have serious ramifications for issues such as child support and alimony. Even if you think that your former partner does not or cannot see your Facebook activity, this is not the place to air your grievances about the marriage or divorce. If you make comments online that can be proven false, such as claiming that your ex is not meeting his or her child support obligations, the other party can sue you for libel. Also consider the long-term ramifications; if you post negative things about the other spouse and he or she loses a job because of it, their ability to pay child support or alimony could be severely limited, and they could approach the court to ask for a reduced amount. Another thing to remember is that Facebook is forever. What you write, can almost always be recovered and brought to the attention of a court, even if you have erased it from your news feed. That heightens the risk that a child may one day read the negative things you said about the other parent.

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Boston spouses and parents should beware Smartphone use

Amidst the evolution of evidence introduced in Massachusetts’ divorce matters, some parents find that what they post online or text message to friends or family can impact custody decisions in court. In fact, the contents of the other parent’s Smartphone may provide key substantiation of improper conduct. These new devices and online venues have forced divorce attorneys to become more ingenious in their discovery efforts during their client’s divorce case. A Smartphone is a treasure trove of personal data that can be stored for long periods of time, even years, and can reveal much about the other parent’s moral character and activities. A recent news article discussed the kinds of information that divorce attorneys can use by obtaining evidence from the other parent’s Smartphone use. In addition to storing content like photos and videos, Smartphones might contain a user’s Internet browsing history, calendar entries, calling history, and other information about the user’s activities. One of the biggest things that individuals should be aware of, that could interest the other parent’s attorney and the family law judge, is what they are saying about the other parent. This can be an important deciding factor in a child custody case. Information about the other parent could take many forms, including the contents of text messages, voicemail messages, emails, and social media posts. There are other types of information that can affect the outcome of a divorce case. The former spouse’s divorce lawyer will be searching for evidence, depending on the state, of another

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